Category Archives: Achilles tendon

Here We Grow Again: We’re Coming to Holly Springs!

Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center is pleased to announce the addition of its Holly Springs office in November 2018. The new state-of-the-art podiatry practice will open at 1004 Werrington Drive, Ste. 300 in Main Street Square along G.B. Alford Highway (Hwy 55). The practice will offer foot and ankle care for all ages. Services will include surgical and non-surgical treatment for skin and nail conditions, fractures, sprains, sports injuries, birth deformities, foreign bodies, diabetic foot care and disorders, pediatric conditions, nerve disorders, and wounds.

“Our vision is to serve the community by providing compassionate and progressive foot and ankle care for children, adolescents, and adults,” said Dr. Kirk Woelffer. “And our mission is to provide advanced care through a dedicated, well-trained healthcare team in a friendly, professional setting.”

“We offer the latest advances in technology to get you back on your feet quickly,” said Dr. Alan Boehm. “This includes digital x-rays, Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT), ultrasound, 3D scanning for custom molded orthotics, and laser therapy for toenail fungus.”

The Holly Springs office will also feature an onsite nail care salon with medically trained technicians who will perform podiatrist-supervised pedicures for patients, including those with diabetes.

Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center’s surgeons Dr. Kirk Woelffer, Dr. Alan Boehm, Dr. Jordan Meyers, and Dr. Alyssa Carroll bring over 35 years of trusted podiatry experience. They volunteer at Open Door Clinic, Alliance Medical Ministry, and Project Homeless Connect.

“Holly Springs has seen a tremendous amount of growth, with little increase in available foot and ankle care,” said Dr. Jordan Meyers. “Making time to go to the doctor is challenging enough, so we are excited to provide advanced foot and ankle care a little closer to home for all the great people in Holly Springs and its surrounding areas. This also provides an opportunity for us to not only offer great medical care, but contribute and give back to the community through various avenues of charitable work.”

Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center plans to open the Holly Springs satellite office on November 12, 2018. For more information call (919) 850-9111 or visit www.RaleighFootAndAnkleCenter.com. Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center is a division of Foot & Ankle Specialists of the Mid-Atlantic, LLC.

 

Gear Up for Running Outdoors This Winter

Gear up for running outdoors this winter. You may be wondering, how will I run in the brutal cold of North Carolina winters?! Maybe the use of the word “brutal” is a bit out of place, but still never underestimate the cold and what it can do to your body. Use these tips to make sure your feet, and the rest of you, are prepared to battle the elements.

Let’s get started with what we like to discuss the most, your feet! To keep your feet warm we recommend using shoes with the least amount of slush. Ideally, the uppers of the shoe will also have GoreTex lining to help keep out the slush. SmartWool socks are also very important to help wick away sweat but hold in as much warmth as possible. You don’t want to get blisters! You should also have some common sense: if there is snow and ice on the ground, maybe run on the treadmill that day instead. One misstep and a slip on the ice could result in a sprained ankle or worse!

Your innermost layer needs to be snug fitting and sweat-wicking. Outer layers should be waterproof, windproof, and be able to cool as well as you get further into your run and your body starts to warm up. Make sure to always protect your face, head, and extremities with layers. Generally, many expert running guides recommend at least 2 top and one bottom layer for 30 degree temperatures, 2 tops and 2 bottoms for 10 to 20 degree temperatures, and 3 tops and 2 bottoms for zero to 10 degree temperatures. If you are in North Carolina running in temperatures below zero, then you deserve to wear as many layers as you want, and a medal for dedication!

It’s also important to warm up well before you run. You need to get moving and get the blood flowing so the cold won’t feel quite as cold, and your body will be more prepared for your run with less chance of injury. Don’t forget you still need to layer to deal with wind and rain, and also make sure to wear bright clothes so you can be seen!

Don’t focus on training to push yourself for record times, but instead focus on the fact that you are staying motivated and still training against the elements and keeping your endurance up. And most important of all, listen to your body. If you start to tire or feel exhausted, take a break. Pushing yourself too hard can cause injury like sprained ankles or Achilles tendinitis. Run safe during the winter months, and come see us at Raleigh Foot and Ankle Center if you are having any foot or ankle pain! Call us at (919) 850-9111 or visit our website to request an appointment.

In the News: Celebs Have Foot Problems, Too

Last week was a bad one for famous feet. You may have seen that pop singer Taylor Swift was recently photographed at a concert on the Asian leg of her 1989 tour wearing an ankle brace – and she was still wearing her high heels on stage! Swift officially has Achilles tendinitis, also known as inflammation of the Achilles tendon.

If you have Achilles tendinitis you’re probably feeling pain where the tendon attaches to the heel bone, or along the back of your ankle. The injury usually occurs due to chronic, repetitive strain. In Swift’s case, wearing sky-high heels every night on stage for the duration of her world tour probably did the trick.

It wasn’t a good weekend for feet in the world of sports, either. Among the casualties is Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, who left the game on Sunday with a foot injury that turned out to be plantar fasciitis. Manning actually has a partial tear in the plantar fascia of his left foot. The Broncos will not start him in their next game against the Chicago Bears.

Plantar fasciitis is also inflammation of a ligament, but the plantar fascia is on the bottom of your foot. If you have it, you probably describe it as heel pain, but you may also feel pain along the arch of your foot. Sometimes the pain improves with activity, but over-use of the foot can make it worse. It can be very, very painful!

So what can you do if you think you’re suffering from Achilles tendinitis or plantar fasciitis? You can always call Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center at (919) 850-9111 and ask to see one of our board-certified podiatrists. You can also request an appointment online. Our doctors will give you a thorough exam and then discuss possible treatments with you. Rest is almost always part of the answer – in Swift’s case, they would probably recommend she stop wearing those high heels.

Remember – you don’t have to suffer from foot and ankle pain. The doctors at Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center are happy to help you with any problems you have with your feet. Call us today at (919) 850-9111 to make an appointment.

In the News: Achilles Tendon Rupture

 

If you watch football, you might have seen that former Carolina Panthers wide receiver (and current Baltimore Raven) Steve Smith tore his Achilles tendon in a football game against the San Diego Chargers. After catching a pass, Smith went to the ground and clutched his lower leg. He had to be helped off the field by Ravens athletic trainers. It was later announced that the torn Achilles tendon has brought Smith’s season to an end.

The podiatrists at Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center frequently treat sports-related injuries like these. Here are some common questions we answer about this injury:

What is the Achilles tendon?

The Achilles is the major tendon located at the back of the ankle. It connects the ankle to the muscles in your lower leg.

What causes the Achilles tendon to tear?

Excessive strain. It’s usually seen in athletes (like Steve Smith) who are very active and put a lot of strain on their lower leg and ankle.

How do you treat a torn Achilles tendon?

Usually surgery, sometimes putting a cast on the leg can help, too.

How is this different from Achilles tendinitis? Are they related?

Tendinitis is an irritation of tendon fibers but the tendon is still intact, not torn or ruptured. A rupture is when the tendon completely tears and is usually a lot more painful. Click here for more information on Achilles tendinitis and possible treatments.

How can I prevent my Achilles tendon from tearing?

It can be difficult to predict. In general, remember to warm-up and stretch before exercise.

How do I know if I need to see a podiatrist for my Achilles tendon?

One word: pain! If you ever experience pain in your Achilles tendon, or any other part of your feet and ankles, call Raleigh Foot & Ankle Center at (919) 850-9111 or request an appointment online and make an appointment today. We frequently have same-day appointments available, and we now have a second location on Blue Ridge Road which may be more convenient for you.